US to cut carrier fleet in Persian Gulf to 1

Military SequestrationThank you, Mr Obama, for this obvious political gift. Our sequestration.

From YahooNews.com:

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is cutting its aircraft carrier presence in the Persian Gulf region from two carriers to one, the Defense Department said Wednesday, in a move that represents one of the most significant effects of budget cuts on the U.S. military presence overseas. The decision comes as Washington struggles to find a way to avoid sharp automatic spending cuts set to strike the Pentagon and domestic programs next month.

Defense Secretary Leon Panetta has approved keeping just one carrier in the Persian Gulf region. The U.S. has maintained two aircraft carrier groups in the Gulf for most of the last two years.

Panetta has been leading a campaign to replace the automatic cuts he warns would “hollow out” the military, and the Pentagon has been providing greater details on the cuts it would have to make if Congress fails to both replace them and agree on a 2013 defense budget bill. The carrier decision is one of the most significant announcements made thus far.

Go here and here and here for more information.

But, naturally, as the rest of America and its military are cut to the bone via Mr Obama’s sequestration, let us take joy and pride in the fact that Joe Biden, our efficient and intellectual vice president, has received a pay hike.

President Barack Obama issued an executive order to end the pay freeze on federal employees, in effect giving some federal workers a raise. One federal worker now to receive a pay increase is Vice President Joe Biden.

 According to disclosure forms, Biden made a cool $225,521 last year. After the pay increase, he’ll now make $231,900 per year.

Also on the list for a pay bump are all of the Senators, House members, John Boehner, majority and minority leaders in both chambers and all the members of the Supreme Court.  They — frankly — got “theirs.”

But, in consideration, perhaps it’s time to realize that the Middle East isn’t any kind of “hot spot” and that, in truth, its delicacy is only offered up by those who wish to exploit global politics over the national good.

Because the Middle East is the last place the United States could expect immediate and serious trouble, is it not?

Frankly, I think it’s time to insert a few US carrier groups off the Canadian coasts.  Because any country who would quantify their coins as either a Loonie or a Toonie.  .  .

BZ

For those interested, an historical list of our US aircraft carriers:

# Name Commissioned Class Status
CV-1 Langley 1922 Langley-class, lead ship Sunk, 27 February 1942 65 nm south of Cilacap, Java
CV-2 Lexington 1927 Lexington-class, lead ship Sunk, 8 May 1942 in the Battle of the Coral Sea
CV-3 Saratoga 1927 Lexington-class Sunk, 25 July 1946 in Operation Crossroads as a nuclear test target
CV-4 Ranger 1934 Ranger-class, lead ship Decommissioned: 18 October 1946. Scrapped 1947
CV-5 Yorktown 1937 Yorktown-class, lead ship Sunk, 7 June 1942 in the Battle of Midway
CV-6 Enterprise 1938 Yorktown-class Decommissioned: 17 February 1947. Scrapped 1960
CV-7 Wasp 1940 Wasp-class, lead ship Sunk, 15 September 1942 during the Guadalcanal campaign
CV-8 Hornet 1941 Yorktown-class Sunk, 27 October 1942 in the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands
CV-9 a, c, d Essex 1942 Essex-class, lead ship Decommissioned: 30 June 1969. Scrapped 1975
CV-10 a, c, d Yorktown 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 27 June 1970. Preserved, Patriot’s Point Naval & Maritime MuseumMount Pleasant, South Carolina, USA
CV-11 b, c, d Intrepid 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 15 March 1974. Preserved, Intrepid Sea-Air-Space MuseumNew York, New York, USA
CV-12 a, c, d Hornet 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 26 June 1970. Preserved, USS Hornet MuseumAlameda, California, USA
CV-13 Franklin 1944 Essex-class Decommissioned: 17 February 1947. Scrapped 1966
CV-14 b, c, d Ticonderoga 1944 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 1 September 1973. Scrapped 1975
CV-15 a, c, d Randolph 1944 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 13 February 1969. Scrapped 1975
CV-16 b, c, f Lexington 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 8 November 1991. Preserved, USS Lexington Museum On the BayCorpus Christi, Texas, USA
CV-17 Bunker Hill 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 9 January 1947. Scrapped 1973
CV-18 a, c, d Wasp 1943 Essex-class Decommissioned: 1 July 1972. Scrapped 1973
CV-19 b, c Hancock 1944 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 30 January 1976. Scrapped 1976
CV-20 a, c, d Bennington 1944 Essex-class Decommissioned: 15 January 1970. Scrapped 1994
CV-21 e Boxer 1945 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 1 December 1969. Scrapped 1971
CVL-22 Independence 1943 Independence-class light carrier, lead ship Nuclear test target in Operation Crossroads, July 1946. Decommissioned: 28 August 1946. Scuttled 29 January 1951
CVL-23 Princeton 1943 Independence-class Sunk, 24 October 1944, Battle of Leyte Gulf
CVL-24 Belleau Wood 1943 Independence-class Transferred to France as Bois Belleau (R97) (1953–1960). Returned to U.S. Scrapped 1960
CVL-25 Cowpens 1943 Independence-class Decommissioned: 13 January 1947. Scrapped 1960
CVL-26 Monterey 1943 Independence-class Decommissioned: 16 January 1956. Scrapped 1971
CVL-27 Langley 1943 Independence-class Transferred to France as La Fayette (R96) (1951–1963). Returned to U.S. Scrapped 1964
CVL-28 Cabot 1943 Independence-class Transferred to Spain as Dédalo (R-01) (1967–1989). Returned to the U.S. Scrapped 2002
CVL-29 Bataan 1943 Independence-class Decommissioned: 9 April 1954. Scrapped 1961
CVL-30 San Jacinto 1943 Independence-class Decommissioned: 1 March 1947. Scrapped 1972
CV-31 b, c Bon Homme Richard 1944 Essex-class Decommissioned: 2 July 1971. Scrapped 1992
CV-32 d Leyte 1946 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 15 May 1959. Scrapped 1970
CV-33 a, c, d Kearsarge 1946 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 13 February 1970. Scrapped 1974
CV-34 a, b, c Oriskany 1950 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 30 September 1976. Scuttled as an artificial reef, May 2006 in the Gulf of Mexico[1]
CV-35 Reprisal Canceled
(August 12, 1945)
Long hull Essex-class Canceled while under construction. Hulk launched in 1946 and used for experiments and explosive tests. Scrapped 1949
CV-36 d Antietam 1945 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 8 May 1963. Scrapped 28 February 1974
CV-37 e Princeton 1945 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 30 January 1970. Scrapped 1971
CV-38 b, c, d Shangri-la 1944 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 30 July 1971. Scrapped 1988
CV-39 a,d Lake Champlain 1945 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 2 May 1966. Scrapped 1972
CV-40 d Tarawa 1945 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 13 May 1960. Scrapped 1968
CVB-41 b, c Midway 1945 Midway-class, lead ship Decommissioned: 11 April 1992. Preserved, USS Midway MuseumSan Diego, California, USA
CVB-42 b, c Franklin D. Roosevelt 1945 Midway-class Decommissioned: 30 September 1977. Scrapped 1978
CVB-43 b, c Coral Sea 1947 Midway-class Decommissioned: 26 April 1990. Scrapped 2000
CVB-44 Canceled Midway-class Canceled
CV-45 e Valley Forge 1946 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 15 January 1970. Scrapped 1971
CV-46 Iwo Jima Canceled
(August 12, 1945)
Long hull Essex-class Canceled while under construction. Scrapped 1946
CV-47 d Philippine Sea 1946 Long hull Essex-class Decommissioned: 28 December 1958. Scrapped 1971
CVL-48 Saipan 1946 Saipan-class, lead ship Converted to USS Arlington (AGMR-2) 1966. Decommissioned: 14 January 1970. Scrapped 1976
CVL-49 Wright 1947 Saipan-class Converted to USS Wright (CC-2) 1963. Decommissioned: 27 May 1970. Scrapped 1980
CV-50 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CV-51 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CV-52 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CV-53 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CV-54 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CV-55 Canceled Long hull Essex-class Canceled
CVB-56 Canceled Midway-class Canceled
CVB-57 Canceled Midway-class Canceled
CVA-58 United States Canceled
(April 23, 1949)
United States-class supercarrier, lead ship Canceled five days after the ship’s keel was laid down
CV-59 Forrestal 1955 Forrestal-class supercarrier, lead ship Decommissioned 11 September 1993. Currently docked at NISMF, Philadelphia, PA
CV-60 Saratoga 1956 Forrestal-class supercarrier Decommissioned 20 August 1994. To be dismantled at NS Newport, RI[2]
CV-61 Ranger 1957 Forrestal-class supercarrier Decommissioned 10 July 1993. On donation hold, docked at NISMF, Bremerton, WA
CV-62 Independence 1959 Forrestal-class supercarrier Decommissioned 30 September 1998. Awaiting disposal, docked at NISMF, Bremerton, WA
CV-63 Kitty Hawk 1961 Kitty Hawk–class supercarrier, lead ship Decommissioned 12 May 2009. In reserve until 2015, docked at NISMF, Bremerton, WA
CV-64 Constellation 1961 Kitty Hawk–class supercarrier Decommissioned 6 August 2003. Awaiting disposal, docked at NISMF, Bremerton, WA
CVN-65 Enterprise 1961 Enterprise-class supercarrier, lead ship Inactive 1 December 2012. Decommission 15 March 2013 (scheduled).
Awaiting defueling, docked at Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, VA.[3]
Slated for disposal[3]
CV-66 America 1965 Kitty Hawk–class supercarrier Decommissioned 9 August 1996. Scuttled in 2005 as a live-fire test platform
CV-67 John F. Kennedy 1968 Kennedy-class supercarrier, lead ship Decommissioned 1 August 2007. On donation hold, docked at NISMF, Philadelphia, PA.
CVN-68 Nimitz 1975 Nimitz-class supercarrier, lead ship Active; Homeport: Naval Station Everett, Everett, Washington
CVN-69 Dwight D. Eisenhower 1977 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia
CVN-70 Carl Vinson 1981 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California
CVN-71 Theodore Roosevelt 1986 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia
CVN-72 Abraham Lincoln 1989 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia
CVN-73 George Washington 1992 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Yokosuka Naval Base, Yokosuka, Japan
CVN-74 John C. Stennis 1995 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, Washington
CVN-75 Harry S. Truman 1998 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia
CVN-76 Ronald Reagan 2003 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Base Kitsap: Bremerton
CVN-77 George H.W. Bush 2009 Nimitz-class supercarrier Active; Homeport: Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia
CVN-78 Gerald R. Ford 2015[4] Ford-class supercarrier, lead ship Keel laid; Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
CVN-79 John F. Kennedy ~2020[4] Ford-class supercarrier First steel cut; Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia
CVN-80 Enterprise[3] ~2025[4] Ford-class supercarrier Planned; Newport News Shipbuilding, Newport News, Virginia

Further:

The United States now cannot afford to accomplish the USS Lincoln overhaul and refueling.

From MaritimeExecutive.com:

The aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) will not start due to a lack of funding, the Navy said Feb. 8.

Lincoln was expected to move to Newport News shipyard next week to begin the overhaul. However, as a result of the fiscal constraints resulting from the ongoing continuing resolution (CR), the contract for the refueling complex overhaul (RCOH) has not been issued to Huntington Ingalls Industries, Inc.

Lincoln will remain pierside at Naval Station Norfolk until sufficient funding is received to start the execution of the RCOH. In the meantime, the ship’s Sailors continue to conduct maintenance.

In their 50 year life spans, one RCOH is scheduled for the midpoint of an aircraft carrier’s service life. Lincoln was commissioned 23 years ago Nov. 11, 1989.

The impact of postponing CVN 72’s RCOH is three-fold:

* the time scheduled for the RCOH will have to be lengthened because the overhaul won’t begin when it was expected,

* delayed redelivery of Lincoln to the fleet,

* and impacts to industry (takes away money/jobs and can delay subsequent scheduled availabilities).

Cancelling or delaying maintenance creates a significant backlog of deferred maintenance and affects future year schedules and costs, as well as future readiness. The delay in Lincoln’s RCOH will affect other carrier work. Because of the short time available between sequential dockings, the delay will also result in day-for-day impacts to the defueling of the recently inactivated Enterprise (CVN 65) and the start of USS George Washington’s (CVN 73) RCOH.

BZ

 

 

9 thoughts on “US to cut carrier fleet in Persian Gulf to 1

  1. So we can’t afford to keep our navy at sea. Could the use of biofuels that cost many times more than conventional fossil fuels have anything to do with it?

  2. My Lord! Are we going to see another massacre like Benghazi????? God help our men and women in uniform!!

    There has got to be a way to impeach him before he leaves us our military and our nation totally defenseless.

    I can’t believe this is happening to America! I hope every single idiot that voted for Obama are pleased with themselves for voting him back in, including all the dead people who voted for him as well.

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